Home » DIFFERENCE BETWEEN » Bacteria vs Fungi- 25 Major Differences
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN

Bacteria vs Fungi- 25 Major Differences

Bacteria vs Fungi- 25 Major Differences

Bacteria and fungi fascinate! These tiny creatures are essential to Earth’s ecosystems and human well-being. Understanding microbes and fungus is crucial to understanding our planet. Bacteria are single-celled bacteria in the domain Bacteria. They live in deep-sea vents and human guts. Bacteria have no nucleus or membrane-bound organelles. They power the food cycle, nitrogen fixation, and breakdown despite their modest size. Symbiotic bacteria help plants and animals survive and flourish.

Eukaryotic fungi include yeasts, molds, and mushrooms. Fungi have nuclei and membrane-bound organelles, unlike bacteria. Ecosystems depend on them for decomposing organic materials and recycling nutrients. Mycorrhizal networks help plants absorb nutrients from fungi. Fungi provide food, medicine, and enzymes, making them economically and ecologically important.

This thorough overview covers bacteria and fungi’s features, categorization, ecological functions, and uses. We’ll examine their traits, reproduction, and nutrition. We’ll also look at their crucial functions in the nutrient cycle and symbiotic partnerships. We shall also examine their health effects, both positive and negative.

This handbook is for students, researchers, and interested people who want to learn about bacteria and fungi. We’ll explore microbes and fungi’s amazing talents and deep impact on our lives.

Also read: Archaea vs Bacteria- 20 Differences

S. No.

Aspect

Bacteria

Fungi

1

Definition

Microscopic single-celled organisms

Microorganisms with eukaryotic cells

2

Cell Type

Prokaryotic (lack a nucleus)

Eukaryotic (have a nucleus)

3

Examples

Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus

Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus

4

Structure

Simple, single-celled structure

Complex, multicellular or unicellular

5

Cell Wall

Present

Present in most, composed of chitin

6

Reproduction

Binary fission (asexual)

Spores (asexual and sexual reproduction)

7

Size

Typically smaller (few micrometers)

Larger (tens to hundreds of micrometers)

8

Metabolism

Diverse, some can perform photosynthesis

Heterotrophic, absorb nutrients externally

9

Antibiotic resistance

Can develop antibiotic resistance

Less likely to develop antibiotic resistance

10

Disease-causing potential

Some species are pathogenic

Some species are pathogenic, causing fungal infections

11

Modes of transmission

Direct contact, air, water, food

Airborne, direct contact, contaminated surfaces

12

Role in ecosystem

Decomposers, nitrogen fixation, symbiotic relationships

Decomposers, mutualistic relationships with plants

13

Growth conditions

Can thrive in various environments (extremophiles exist)

Prefer specific environmental conditions (temperature, pH)

14

Respiration

Can be aerobic or anaerobic

Mostly aerobic, some species can be anaerobic

15

Movement

Some species are motile (flagella)

Non-motile, except some aquatic fungi

16

Energy source

Organic or inorganic compounds

Organic matter, dead organisms

17

Cell division

Binary fission

Mitosis or meiosis

18

Antibiotics

Produce antibiotics (e.g., penicillin)

Not known to produce antibiotics

19

Genetic material

Circular DNA (plasmids)

Linear DNA, multiple chromosomes

20

Examples of diseases

Tuberculosis, pneumonia, cholera

Athlete’s foot, ringworm, candidiasis

21

Cell organelles

Lack membrane-bound organelles

Possess membrane-bound organelles

22

Hyphae

Absent

Present, forming a network of filaments

23

Spores

Rarely form spores

Form spores for reproduction and dispersal

24

Cell membrane

Composed of peptidoglycan

Composed of ergosterol

25

Examples of beneficial roles

Gut microbiota, nitrogen fixation, food production

Decomposition, mycorrhizal relationships with plants

26

Disease treatment

Antibiotics effective against bacterial infections

Antifungal medications for fungal infections

27

Examples of symbiotic relationships

Gut flora in humans, nitrogen-fixing bacteria in legumes

Mycorrhizal association with plant roots

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQS)

Q1: What are Bacteria and fungi?

Bacteria and fungus are different microbes. Fungi can be unicellular (yeasts) or multicellular (molds and mushrooms), while bacteria are single-celled prokaryotic creatures.

Q2: How do bacteria and fungi differ in terms of cellularly?

Fungi have nuclei and other membrane-bound organelles, whereas bacteria have not. The cell types of prokaryotes (bacteria) and eukaryotes (fungi) cause this structural difference.

Q3: What are the main modes of nutrition for bacteria and fungi?

Bacteria can be autotrophic or heterotrophic. Heterotrophic fungi feed on organic materials or parasites.

Q4: How do bacteria and fungus reproduce?

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission. Fungi reproduce sexually and asexually. Spores may spread and form new creatures.

Q5: What are some common examples of bacteria and fungi?

Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus are bacteria. Candida, Aspergillus, and Penicillium are fungus.

Q6: How do bacteria and fungi impact human health?

Bacteria may cause strep throat, UTIs, and pneumonia. Some fungi release toxins and cause illnesses like yeast or fungal nail infections.

Q7: What are the ecological roles of bacteria and fungi?

Bacteria help ecosystems cycle nutrients, decompose, and fix nitrogen. Fungi degrade organic debris, recycle nutrients, and live in symbiosis with plants.

Q8: Can bacteria and fungi be beneficial to humans?

Bacteria and fungus benefit. Bacteria make yogurt and medications. Fungi are used to make bread, cheese, enzymes, antibiotics, and immunosuppressants.

Q9: Are bacteria or fungi more resistant to antibiotics?

Bacteria develop antibiotic resistance faster than fungi. They gain resistance genes by transferring genetic material across cells. Fungi seldom develop resistance.

Q10: Can bacteria and fungi interact with each other in nature?

Bacteria and fungus interact. Fungi and bacteria may both create antibacterial chemicals. Fungi and plant roots can create mycorrhizal connections.

Summary

 

 

Sending
User Review
0 (0 votes)

Related Articles

Innate Immunity vs Adaptive Immunity- 35 Differences

Laboratory Hub Team

38 differences between good and bad cholesterol

Laboratory Hub Team

Staphylococcus vs Streptococcus- 25 Major Differences

Laboratory Hub Team

Top 21 Difference Between Red Blood Cells And White Blood Cells (RBCs Vs. WBCs)

Laboratory Hub Team

Communicable vs Non-communicable Diseases-  24 Differences

Laboratory Hub Team

38 Differences Between DHA And EPA

Laboratory Hub Team

Leave a Comment

* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this. Accept Read More